At the Ref Desk (10/6/18): (Question of the Day): "For how much time can I ask you questions?" I told him we were open till nine. [more...]

First Law of Electronic Reserves

Submitted by Leo Klein on Sat, 8/15/09 (4:27pm)

Make sure your students have a copy of your syllabus just in case the frickin' server breaks down.

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1 comment

by Danny Bloom on Sun, 8/16/09 (2:08am)

have you heard of the BINDLE? can yoiu blog humorously on this idea?

thanks

DANNY BLOOM in Taiwan, email me to confirm

It's Bindle vs Kindle in War of Reading Devices

HSINCHU SCIENCE PARK, TAIWAN -- As the war of words heats up between Mr Paper and Mrs. Kindle, a savvy new technology company in Taiwan has come up with a new reading device to rival the ubiqitous Kindle (TM) from Amazon's Jeff Bezos. It's called the Bindle (TM).

What's a Bindle, you ask? "It's a book printed on paper, bound with a spine and supported by both a front cover and a back cover, and it's usually activated by turning the pages manually," says Bindle spokesvehicle Dan Bloom, a Taiwan-based tech consultant. "It's a throwback to the old days before Kindles hijacked the traditional reading experience and turned it into a completely foreign experience."

Bloom, 60, who says he doesn't even own a computer and considers himself a devoted Luddite, says he believes that the Bindle will"liberate the book as a book and bring the reading experience of the last 500 years back in sync with what the Good Lord intended."

"I am worried that humans might forget how to read on paper if the Kindle really catches on and turns an entire generation into kindling text screeners," says Bloom.

With millions of Bindles already in circulation coast to coast, and at a much lower cost than the $399.99 Kindle device, Bloom -- who is no relation to Harold Bloom at Yale, although they share the same love of books and the same worries over how e-books might spell the death of civilization -- says he submitted the defintion of a Bindle to the editors at the Google-based UrbanDictionary.com where it was accepted and published online.

So welcome to the brave new world of the Bindle, America. Kindles now have something real to be very very afraid of.